Canonical Approaches to the Bible

Programme

After the discussions on framings, beginnings, and endings of biblical books and larger units in the last three years, the research group shifts its focus to a new and exciting topic: Torah as a basis of canon. The concept of Torah has seen a recent and resurging interest in the scholarly debate e.g. with the 2017 volume “The Invention of Judaism” by John J. Collins. The lexeme torah links the books of the Hebrew Canon from Genesis to Deuteronomy, from Joshua to 2 Kings, from Isaiah to Haggai, and from Psalms to 2 Chronicles. The partially corresponding Greek lexeme nomos is found in the Gospels and the letters of the New Testament. We do not want to limit our research to links created by these words but we seek to take a closer look with the following preliminary three-year program: 

In 2019, we invite case studies which deal with specific biblical texts as they relate to Torah and canon. In 2020, we focus on broader ethical, thematic, and theological themes. The topic of the third year, 2021, concerns groups or communities for which Torah as a concept does or, on the contrary, does not play an important role for their respective identity and how they consequently deal with those texts.

Keywords:

Literary Features, Narratology, Style, Hebrew Bible, Ancient Near East

Chairs

Oliver Dyma
Catholic University of Applied Sciences Munich

Heiko Wenzel
Giessen School of Theology

Member Area

Wuppertal 2021 Call for Papers

Canonical Perspectives on Torah (Part II+III)

The current three-year program of our research group is focused on canonical perspectives on Torah as a basis of canon. The concept of Torah has seen a recent and resurging interest in the scholarly debate. In 2019 (Warsaw) we head an engaging session in dealing with specific biblical texts as they relate to Torah and canon. Different aspects and concepts of Torah have emerged. Is Torah defined as textual entity or by content, is it written and/or oral? How do we account for dynamic aspects of Torah (doing, interpreting, teaching and learning)? We discussed connected terms and concepts, the question of authority and institutions or more generally speaking of power as well as aspects of structure and genre. Some texts seem to be of particular importance, for example Deuteronomy 31.

 Our general plan has proved valid and we will focus on broader ethical, thematic, and theological themes as planned for Wuppertal in 2020. We also include topics of the third year that concerns groups or communities for which Torah as a concept does or, on the contrary, does not play an important role for their respective identity and how they consequently deal with those texts. At the meeting Wuppertal 2021, we hear papers submitted for 2020 and invite papers dealing with group and communities.  

Papers from the area of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, New Testament, or Second Temple literature are welcome. We especially encourage New Testament scholars to participate.



The Annual Conference 2021
takes place 2-5 August
online, hosted in Wuppertal.
Read more.